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Parents Eat More Saturated Fat

Parents Eat More Saturated Fat



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Child-free people less likely to eat ‘convenience’ foods

Wikimedia/National Archives

Normally dad doesn’t get to blame his expanding figure on the kids, but a new study has shown that new parents actually eat more saturated fat than do people who don’t have kids.

According to CNN, while most parents intend to improve their diets to be better nutritional role models after having children, few actually manage to do that and many actually wind up eating less healthfully than they did before, especially when it comes to saturated fat.

The study, which was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, followed more than 2,000 adults for 20 years. It tracked the eating habits of parents for seven years after the births of their children and compared those results with the eating habits of childless people.

"Parents of younger children do tend to bring in more convenience foods into the home more often," said Dr. Helena Laroche, the lead author on the study. The greater reliance on more convenient food could explain the differences in saturated fat intake, she said.

The study looked at how much saturated fat was in the diets, as well as how many fruits and vegetables were eaten and how much soda and juice and fast food was consumed.

Surprisingly, while the parents consumed more saturated fat than non-parents, otherwise their diets were otherwise similarly unhealthful.

“Ultimately, neither had the ideal diet at the end of seven years,” Laroche said.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.


Weight Watchers Recipes with SmartPoints

Weight Watchers has its own program where instead of calorie counting, they use SmartPoints which are far smarter than the former. The SmartPoints are determined using calories, saturated fat, sugar, and protein. Foods that are higher in sugar and/or saturated fat are higher in SmartPoints values, and foods that are higher in lean protein are lower in SmartPoints values.

The good news is that most fruits and vegetables have a SmartPoints value of 0.

ZeroPoint foods are exactly what they sound like – foods that have zero SmartPoints value. Why? These nutritional powerhouses form the basis of a healthy eating pattern. You can eat ZeroPoint foods without measuring or tracking and still lose weight. This is because they’re less likely to be overeaten than other foods. There are some exceptions for starchy foods like peas, corn, potatoes, and avocados. It is also good to know that protein lowers the SP value. Furthermore, when it comes to calories, 100 calories worth of cookies doesn’t have the same nutritional value as 100 calories of turkey, tofu, or veggies. Two meals might contain the same number of calories, but have a very different SmartPoints value. But with all that said, having a high SmartPoints does not necessarily mean that a food is “bad”, since, in retrospect, no food is bad. It just means that we need to balance the food we consume so that the SmartPoints will be lowered.

But how many SmartPoints should you have? On Weight Watcher’s program, you will get a personalized amount of Daily SmartPoints, plus some extra Weekly SmartPoints for those days when you need a cushion. The amount of SmartPoints you get is based on your age, height, weight, and sex to ensure that you reach your weight-loss goals. But generally, the ideal and common SmartPoints is to not go over 30 SP a day.