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Learning to Love

Learning to Love



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Pinot noir is a grape that seems to attract California winemakers the way a charming but unpredictable woman or man attracts a potential lover. The emotional conflict is over how much they can change the basic nature of the grape — or person — and how much they learn to treasure it for what it is.

For years, West Coast winemakers carried tattered photos in their wallets and purses of a wine that had the haunting fragrance of red Burgundy and hoped that California pinot noir, with time, love, and money, would match that image.

It seldom has, so recently most California winemakers have accepted the fact that for all their talk of clones and terroir, West Coast pinot has a basic character that is not Burgundy. It is riper and fruitier (ironically, often having some merlot-like qualities), grapier on the finish, and generally more alcoholic. In fact, most of the wines reviewed below have alcohol levels of around 14.5. percent

This does not mean that California pinots are better or worse than Burgundy reds. They retain their own sometimes-roguish charm. And, for the most part, regional winemakers have accepted Stephen Stills’ advice: “And if you can’t be with the one you love, honey, love the one you’re with.”

2012 Belle Ambiance California pinot noir ($8): Fruity and rooty with some fresh cola flavors and fair acidity in the finish. A simple wine, but nevertheless nice drinking.

2014 Calista Coast Range pinot noir ($21): Rounded cherry flavors, some cola, some root beer with very good mouth feel and good finishing crispness.

2012 FEL Anderson Valley pinot noir ($35): From the Lede family, this pinot has fresh cherry sweetness balanced beautifully by a nutty, lightly tannic finish — think cherry + walnut. There is also a nice tangy quality. My Pick of the Litter.

2012 Frank Family Carneros pinot noir ($34): Well-structured with ripe Bing cherries, a pleasant rootiness, and a hint of balsamic. The impression is smooth and velvety.

2012 Robert Mondavi Carneros pinot noir reserve ($60): This pinot has a spicy intensity that sets it apart — cherry flavors, some rootiness, very tangy, tannic. It is very big for a pinot and also quite good one.

Photo Credit: Flickr/Jim Fischer


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


How to Learn to Love Healthy Food (Even If You're a Picky Eater)

One of the most common goals many of us have (beginning of the new year or not) is to start "eating healthy." That's easier said than done for those of us who don't enjoy the usual healthy foods or are simply picky eaters. Whether you have the taste palate of a toddler or are bored to tears by health food, a few simple tricks could help get started eating better.

Health food doesn't have to make you feel deprived, and it can be really inexpensive as well as easy and quick to whip up . To make eating healthy a lasting habit, start with small, simple changes and try new ways of thinking about eating. Here are a few tips.

Twenty Healthy Foods that Cost $1 or Less

Grocery shopping hasn't been getting any cheaper lately, and the rising costs of fresh food in…

Mix What You Like with New Healthy Foods

One trick most parents of fussy eaters have tried is hiding veggies in other, usually sweet foods (a trick that doesn't always work, though. I still can't get over finding white fish mixed in with my rice when I was a kid). You can try a more sophisticated version of this approach by pairing foods you love with ones you want to start incorporating into your diet more: Photo by Matt Scott .

  • Kale is one of those powerful superfoods that you might even like if you pair it with bacon or sausage.
  • Okay, everything's better with bacon. Moderate amounts of cheese can also transform a dish.
  • One study recently showed that topping a burger with an avocado can decrease the inflammatory effects of the red meat.
  • Combining broccoli with mustard might not only make the vegetable taste better, it could boost its nutritional value.
  • Spreading out veggies in a dish of pasta or grains can make the taste of them less offensive. Also, instead of going with the typical tomato sauce, try a pesto or other healthy sauce .
  • As mentioned when we talked about eating healthy even if you hate cooking , a smoothie can not only be quick but also nutritionally complete. You might not even taste the spinach when combined with fruits and other ingredients.
  • Some people don't like healthy foods because they seem bland. To solve that problem, first buy better-quality foods (the fresher the better, which is why we like farmer's markets and CSAs ). Then go ahead and spice up that dish with your favorite flavors. Besides salt and pepper, consider other meal enhancers like chili sauce, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, salsa, teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, garlic, and so on. Appreciating food like a food snob by fully breathing in the dish could also help you taste its nuances.

Try Different Food Preparations or Versions

Up until a few years ago, I was convinced I hated eggs. Now eggs and egg hacks are among my favorite things. The reason? I discovered there's a world beyond scrambled eggs and omelets, which were the only egg preparations Iɽ tried when younger. Photo by James Jordan .

  • Roasted cauliflower or broccoli (instead of steamed/boiled) is a revelation. Seriously, try it if you haven't yet.
  • Instead of canned vegetables (mushy asparagus, yuck), try fresh or frozen. Frozen vegetables are sometimes even better than fresh ones.
  • You might not like certain types of seafood (the oiliness of salmon, for example, or the brininess of oysters), but there are many others you can try, such as the more mild white fishes, including tilapia.
  • Kale chips are surprisingly similar-tasting to other, less nutritious chips. (Even my daughter, who lives on chicken nuggets, eats them.)
  • Sometimes the brand matters. Campbell's butternut squash soup tastes completely different than the one from Amy's Kitchen.
  • Some people swear a juicer has transformed their relationship with vegetables, including ones they've previously hated. You can make fresh juice with a food processor too.
  • If veggies taste too intense to you, try the baby versions (e.g., baby carrots), whose flavors haven't intensified yet.

Eat More of the Healthy Foods You Do Like (and Decrease Less Healthy Ones)

You don't have to force yourself to learn to love kale or any other nutritious food. Healthier eating might just mean increasing the portion of the healthy foods you do like. In stews and foods like shepherd's pie, for example, make the veggies a bigger ratio and the meat and carbs a lower one. The Kitchn suggests doubling the vegetables in any recipe for an easy way to start eating healthier (especially for vegetable-heavy dishes, it shouldn't affect the flavor or your enjoyment of the meals). Photo by epSos.de .

If you want to eat less meat without giving it up completely, try meatless Monday or just one meatless lunch a week, which can challenge your creativity in a good way (though you can use the Meatless Monday website for inspiration). Another trick is to simply minimize the meat portion by skewering it, serving it on the bone, stewing it, and so on .


Watch the video: Η οικογένεια μου - Παιδικό Τραγουδάκι -Greek Nursery Rhymes - Counia Bella (August 2022).